Racial Justice | Kentuckians For The Commonwealth

Racial Justice

KFTC is working for a day when discrimination is wiped out of our laws, habits, and hearts.

Celebrating 40 years of action for justice.

 It’s an important time for the organization. We’re reflecting back on where we’ve been, what we’ve achieved, and what we’ve learned. We’re making big plans for our future.

Why we organize for Climate Justice, Racial Justice, a Just Transition, and a healthy democracy

Anyone in the U.S. under the age of forty and paying attention has lived their entire life aware of the existential threat caused by the global climate crisis. In recent years, Americans of all ages have expressed increased levels of alarm and urgency about climate change. According to Pew Research Center, in 2020 nearly seven-in-ten Biden voters (sixty-eight percent) said climate change was very important to their vote; six-in-ten Americans viewed climate change as “a major threat to the well-being of the U.S.” A Tufts University study found that young Americans named climate change as one of their top three concerns motivating them to vote in 2020, behind COVID-19 and racism.  

Reflecting on the Just Imagine Art Show

Graphic and website created by Seun Erinle of Grid Principles (gridprinciples.com)On Wednesday, May 19, 2021, KFTC members hosted a virtual launch event for The Just Imagine Art Show: Healing harm, sharing grief, envisioning the Kentucky we deserve. 

The idea for this art show emerged from a small crew of KFTC members and staff from the Empower Kentucky Leadership Network – Mikaela Curry, Trinidad Jackson, Tona Barkley, Lisa Abbott, and Nikita Perumal – who have, since late 2019, been working together to deepen KFTC’s understanding of Just Transition.

NKY Chapter hosts People's Hearings

Over the past few months, members in northern Kentucky have been doing deep canvassing in neighborhoods in Covington looking to learn the issues neighbors were facing – with a specific interest in residents and members concerns with affordable housing in the region and the pollution from Interplastic Corporation.

Page

Subscribe to Tags: Racial Justice